2. January 2018

PHD PORTRAITS: LARS ODDERSHEDE – NOVARTIS

In my job, the analytical skills developed during my PhD helps me tremendously on a day to day basis. I would also say that having a PhD made the transition all the more easy for me and enabled me to quickly become operational in a pharmaceutical company.

 

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO DO A PHD, AND WOULD YOU HAVE CHOSEN DIFFERENTLY IF YOU WERE TO DO IT TODAY?
I think the idea grew on me half way through the MSc program. Here I did an article with another student and I really enjoyed that. Both my siblings had completed their PhDs, so I knew a bit about what it entailed. When my supervisor then asked me about my interests in doing a PhD, I quickly decided to grab the opportunity. I told my supervisor that I wanted to do a PhD to learn more before I left the university and that I would leave immediately after (and so I did). I was truly lucky that this was viewed as acceptable, i.e. that my supervisor didn’t merely see a PhD as an entry position for people wanting to work in academia.

While I don’t want to do it again, I wouldn’t have been without this amazing opportunity. Think about it: 3 years further education, you pick the courses, you (co-)pick the topic of your research and you even get paid well (and obviously, my comparison is versus PhD students in other parts of the world).

I feel blessed to have been offered such an opportunity in life.

 

READ FULL INTERVIEW WITH LARS ODDERSHEDE HERE

2. January 2018

PHD PORTRAITS: ANDREAS MØGELMOSE – SOFTWARE DEVELOPER

After my PhD I knew that I wanted to try to work in the corporate world. I actually felt that I owed myself to try to work in the corporate world, to better be able to determine whether I wanted to pursue a career in academia or the industry.

 

HOW CLOSE IS YOUR CURRENT CAREER TO THE IDEAS AND DREAMS YOU HAD AS A PHD FELLOW?
It is pretty close to what I imagined. I didn’t choose to do a PhD because I wanted to enhance my chances on the job market or because I wanted to get a big salary, but mostly because I found the topic and the research interesting.

 

HOW HAVE YOU MADE USE OF YOUR PHD EDUCATION, AND WHICH OF YOUR PHD COMPETENCES HAVE BEEN MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU?

I would say two things;
The topic I focused on during my PhD I use in my work today. That is also the reason that I chose to work at Inropa; here I am able to work with computer vision, which is a rare possibility at companies here in Northern Jutland.

The second thing is my ability to manage and handle projects. During my PhD and postdoc I did lots of self-contained projects in collaboration with other companies and organizations. This is the same as what I do at Inropa today.

 

READ FULL INTERVIEW WITH ANDREAS MØGELMOSE HERE

2. January 2018

PHD PORTRAITS: HENRIK JOHN ANDERSEN, CEO AND SALES MANAGER AT INROPA

I think it was really interesting to do a PhD. You have the chance to concentrate on one specific topic and thing at a time, and simultaneously you are able to teach and develop others. Back then, my biggest concern was if I would become too specialized when I had finished my PhD. Later on, I found out that it is almost impossible to become too specialized.

 

HOW CLOSE IS YOUR CURRENT CAREER TO THE IDEAS AND DREAMS YOU HAD AS A PHD FELLOW?
That is a very tough question. Actually, I don’t really know what I imagined at that point. I just thought that the technology was exciting to work with, which I still think today.

I have always had a dream about becoming self-employed, but did not really think about how demanding it is. As an engineer, I did not think about that I had to do both sales, management, financial management and so on. Many of these tasks I could go without, but the contact with customers and selling our solutions to them I really enjoy.

 

READ FULL INTERVIEW WITH HENRIK JOHN ANDERSEN HERE

2. January 2018

TOBIAS HOLMGAARD STÆR – BUSINESS MANAGER

I made a very deliberate choice of becoming part of the very specialized world that a PhD really is, because I found it very motivating and interesting at the time and there was an opening to be part of a very interesting project. I knew all along that it wasn’t a career at the university that I wanted to pursue, so it would be a timing question for me when I would seek a position in the industry and test my PhD competences in a different context.

 

WHAT HAS YOUR CAREER PATH LOOKED LIKE UP UNTIL NOW?
My career started in the laboratory at AAU, where I worked with some very specialized investigations. From there on, things have really taken an opposite direction and now I basically work as a generalist.

When I started at Mekoprint, I functioned as our responsible for an innovation project in cooperation with both other universities and other companies. My work included a mix of detailed, specialized product innovation on one side and a highly commercial focus on the other side, because it was run by a commercial company. Simultaneously, I was also handling regular client projects, which have started to be a bigger and bigger part of my daily work.

 

READ FULL INTERVIEW WITH TOBIAS HOLMGAARD STÆR HERE

20. December 2017

PHD PORTRAITS: LARS KROGH ALMINDE, PHD FROM AAU

I realised early during my PhD that I was not cut out to be a career researcher, but on the other hand, it is important for me to work with the most complicated technology and brightest people.

 

WHAT IS YOUR TYPICAL WORKDAY LIKE?
At a first glance, my workday is made of meetings, phone calls, and a lot of e-mails. However, when the topics of these interactions include design of new exciting spacecrafts and involve many very talented and inspiring people – it is not as bad as it may sound!

 

Read full article at AAU website