23. January 2018

PHD PORTRAITS: ANDERS TRILLINGSGAARD – UKON HUMAN RESULTS

 

Two years after doing his PhD, Anders became UKON’s head of research, where he is responsible for UKON’s research projects have and also initiating new research projects. His industrial PhD was a success for the company, since it has been a part of UKON’s strategy and brand to positioning the company between the research world and the corporate world.

 

How it started
After many talks with different universities, Anders ended up making an agreement with Aalborg University about an industrial PhD. He says: “It might seem like a cliché, but AAU were much more flexible and better to understand the demands the company had. Moreover, AAU’s research environment suited me well and they were able to understand that I both had to do my work at UKON simultaneously with doing my PhD. Lastly, AAU did not have any intention about influencing my field of research, which was very important for both me and UKON.”

 

Read full interview with Anders here

22. January 2018

PHD PORTRAITS: SAHRA JOSEPHINE HJORTH – CANOPYLAB

 

After two years of work at Rambøll Management, I got inspired by a former fellow student, who went to pursue a PhD. I started thinking whether that could be a career path for me as well. I became aware of a position at the Center for Migration and Diversity at Aalborg University, a position that was actually quite far from the academic field I was educated in, namely international relations. But the PhD project was very appealing to me.

 

I decided to apply and landed the position, which I started in October of 2013. In August 2015, I co-founded CanopyLAB, an educational technology company, but I actually began conceptualizing the idea shortly after I started working on my PhD.

 

Now, Sahra Josephine is CEO (co-founder) at Canopylab, a Copenhagen based eLearning software company. Read full interview with Sahra here.

16. January 2018

SHIFTERs article from Impact on Society Conference

Science for Society invited Norwegian SHIFTER, an online publisher of innovation and technology news, to write about our Impact on Society Conference. And here it is, with the heading: “Researchers seldom become entrepreneurs: but someone does business from saving lives with banana flies!”

Read the full article here (in Norwegian)

2. January 2018

PHD PORTRAITS: LARS ODDERSHEDE – NOVARTIS

In my job, the analytical skills developed during my PhD helps me tremendously on a day to day basis. I would also say that having a PhD made the transition all the more easy for me and enabled me to quickly become operational in a pharmaceutical company.

 

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO DO A PHD, AND WOULD YOU HAVE CHOSEN DIFFERENTLY IF YOU WERE TO DO IT TODAY?
I think the idea grew on me half way through the MSc program. Here I did an article with another student and I really enjoyed that. Both my siblings had completed their PhDs, so I knew a bit about what it entailed. When my supervisor then asked me about my interests in doing a PhD, I quickly decided to grab the opportunity. I told my supervisor that I wanted to do a PhD to learn more before I left the university and that I would leave immediately after (and so I did). I was truly lucky that this was viewed as acceptable, i.e. that my supervisor didn’t merely see a PhD as an entry position for people wanting to work in academia.

While I don’t want to do it again, I wouldn’t have been without this amazing opportunity. Think about it: 3 years further education, you pick the courses, you (co-)pick the topic of your research and you even get paid well (and obviously, my comparison is versus PhD students in other parts of the world).

I feel blessed to have been offered such an opportunity in life.

 

READ FULL INTERVIEW WITH LARS ODDERSHEDE HERE

2. January 2018

PHD PORTRAITS: ANDREAS MØGELMOSE – SOFTWARE DEVELOPER

After my PhD I knew that I wanted to try to work in the corporate world. I actually felt that I owed myself to try to work in the corporate world, to better be able to determine whether I wanted to pursue a career in academia or the industry.

 

HOW CLOSE IS YOUR CURRENT CAREER TO THE IDEAS AND DREAMS YOU HAD AS A PHD FELLOW?
It is pretty close to what I imagined. I didn’t choose to do a PhD because I wanted to enhance my chances on the job market or because I wanted to get a big salary, but mostly because I found the topic and the research interesting.

 

HOW HAVE YOU MADE USE OF YOUR PHD EDUCATION, AND WHICH OF YOUR PHD COMPETENCES HAVE BEEN MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU?

I would say two things;
The topic I focused on during my PhD I use in my work today. That is also the reason that I chose to work at Inropa; here I am able to work with computer vision, which is a rare possibility at companies here in Northern Jutland.

The second thing is my ability to manage and handle projects. During my PhD and postdoc I did lots of self-contained projects in collaboration with other companies and organizations. This is the same as what I do at Inropa today.

 

READ FULL INTERVIEW WITH ANDREAS MØGELMOSE HERE